Hi there. I live and cycle in Brunei where it’s summer temperatures – 31 to 32°C, with high humidity – all year. I’ve been here for 10 months and cycle three or four times a week, averaging 600 to 700km per month.

With there being no ‘off-season,’ how does it effect my body if I cycle 12 months a year with no break? I don’t want a break as I enjoy the cycling too much, but don’t want to burn myself out.
Andy

Hi Andy. I’m sure your letter’s first two 
sentences have just made a lot of our UK 
readers very jealous!

There’s nothing essentially wrong with the volume you’re doing – far from it – and although you’d probably benefit from a drop in exercise volume every six to eight weeks, 
if you’re both fit and healthy there aren’t any 
reasons I can think of why you shouldn’t 
continue your current rides all year round.

Many of the chronic effects of exercise are positive ones. For example, you may develop increased muscular endurance and a greater aerobic capacity. It would be wise, however, to pay attention to the possible problematic ‘side-effects’ that can be experienced through a high volume of cycling as your sole 
exercise.

It’s a good idea to establish a 
stretching regime, to attend to those muscles that become shortened through cycling, and to make sure that you take adequate rest periods if you begin to feel overly fatigued.

Looking at things from a performance 
perspective, variation is an important principle of training, and if you wish to see any gains in your ability to ride faster or further, then you would need to undertake a more specific, 
periodised schedule of riding. This should cover the variations in both volume and effort, along with the inclusion of active recovery, which you’d need to turn your regular rides into structured training.

Rob Mortlock is a BC coach

This article was first published in the December 12 issue of Cycling Weekly. Read Cycling Weekly magazine on the day of release where ever you are in the world International digital edition, UK digital edition. And if you like us, rate us!

  • lee

    Never mind heat: i found once, when beginning back on the bike i stopped for an ice-cream once or twice to get the breath and a short rest as sometimes just riding through tiredness is one sure way to run out of energy, faster. I’ve a friend who likes to ride to close to 20mph as much as possible – i subsequently punctured one, a slowy. I was quite thankfull actually because it allowed me to ‘rest’ whilst fixing it. Pace is underestimated, in reckoning to the ride.