Good news for all you racers this week: it seems you’re not likely to peak until your mid-thirties. There’s no new scientific study, just the fact so many riders these days seem to be improving with age.

Sir Chris Hoy is already the winningest British track rider of all time and just days after his 34th birthday he will be bidding for his 10th rainbow jersey at the Track Cycling World Championships in Copenhagen this week. The Scot may only be 12 months away from World Masters eligibility but he’s positively youthful compared to fellow Worlds rider Jason Queally.

Almost a decade after taking gold in the kilo at the Sydney Olympics, Queally has reinvented himself as a team pursuiter, despite being only one year short of veteran status. He goes to Denmark as a reserve but is aiming for Olympic selection for London 2012 when he’ll be 42.

It’s not just the trackies who are putting the youngsters to shame, as Saturday’s Milan-San Remo proved. Oscar Freire, 34, won the Classic for a third time ahead of Tom Boonen, 29, and Alessandro Petacchi, 36.

And let’s not forget Lance Armstrong will be having one final crack at the Tour de France just two months shy of his 39th birthday.

Robert Garbutt is editor of Cycling Weekly

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  • A Bevan

    Mr. Garbutt, could you please explain what “winningest” means. I could find no reference to it in my dictionary.

  • P R Jones

    Recently retired I feel better able to train,my rest days are exactly that.when you get older you know your body better.you know when to rest when feeling tired or sick,instead off pushing yourself and making things worse,hampering you recovery.

  • Jens Berthol Hansen

    Indeed you could not be more right in your assessment, that the life-span of cycling athletes is expanding. Being Danish and thus following Team Saxo Bank closely I just like to point towards an excellent German rider, Jens Voigt, who manages to win stages and races, whilst also being in his late thirties.

  • Rupert Rivett

    AND THEN THERE IS MALCOLM ELLIOTT

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_Elliott

    I SERIOUSLY THINK THAT LONGEVITY SCIENTIST SHOULD EXAMINE MALCOLM TO SEE WHAT MAKES HIM TICK ! HE MIGHT BE MISSING PIECE IN THE PUZZLE TO FINDING THE ELIXIR OF LIFE!
    Could the Elixir of life actually be Cycling ?