Lance Armstrong has called on the International Olympic Committee to take disciplinary action against the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency Dick Pound.

In an eight-page letter sent to IOC president Jacques Rogge and published on Armstrong’s official supporters’ website (thepaceline.com), the seven-time Tour de France winner attacked Pound and accused him of violating IOC rules during the independent investigation into L?Equipe?s allegations that Armstrong took EPO in the 1999 Tour de France.

Armstrong was cleared of any suspicion of doping by the report by Dutch lawyer Emile Vrijman but Pound described the investigation as ?so lacking in professionalism and objectivity that it borders on farcical.?

Armstrong has responded by calling for Pound?s head.

“If the rules of the Olympic movement are to have any meaning at all, they must be enforced, not just against athletes, but against sports officials and anti-doping officials when they violate the rules,” Armstrong says in an opening statement to the letter.

“The facts revealed in the independent investigator’s report show a pattern of intentional misconduct by WADA officials designed to attack anyone who challenges them, followed by a cover-up to conceal their wrongdoing.?

“This conduct by Pound is just the latest in a long history of ethical transgressions and violations of athletes’ rights. It is now time for the IOC to enforce the rules, to bring closure, and to take action against all of those who were responsible for this unfortunate incident.?

Armstrong threatened to initiate a financial and athletes boycott against WADA in his letter and hopes the IOC will take action against Pound during their Executive Board meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland scheduled for June 21-23.

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