Lance Armstrong has landed in Cape Town, South Africa, for the Cape Argus Cycle Tour, the world’s largest timed mass-participation cycle event which takes place on Sunday, March 14.

The seven-times Tour de France winner announced at the beginning of February that he would be taking part in the gigantic cyclo-sportive, along with over 40,000 other cyclists from all over the world.

However, as soon as the American landed on Monday, he hit a problem – his passport was full and South African immigration authorities had no room to stamp it.

“Well, made it to Cape Town but can’t get in the country since my passport is full and there’s no room to stamp it. So…stuck,” Armstrong said via his online Twitter feed. “Not the friendliest welcome I’ve ever received but we’ve all seen immigration officers like that.”

Armstrong has hooked up with RadioShack team-mate and South African Daryl Impey. The two took a ride around Cape Town on Tuesday morning, which Armstrong described as ‘stunning’.

The Cape Argus Cycle Tour covers 68 miles on March 14, 2010. Last year’s event was blighted by strong winds that saw 25,698 finish, and 15,659 either elect not to start or drop out. 

Armstrong took part in the Tour of Murica in Spain last week, where he finished seventh overall, one minute and 23 seconds behind winner Frantisek Rabon (HTC-Columbia).

Armstrong’s main aim for the season is the Tour de France in July. In an interview published in Spanish paper El Pais on Monday, Armstrong admitted that 2009 winner and former Astana team-mate Alberto Contador will be a hard man to beat.

Related links



Armstrong admits Contador will be heard to beat in the Tour



Armstrong to ride Cape Argus sportive


Cyclo-sportive: Cape Argus Pick ‘n’ Pay Cycle Tour

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  • Ken Evans

    “…we’ve all seen immigration officers like that.”

    Yes.