According to Campagnolo, its 2011 Super Record component set “is speeding up, overtaking even itself!”



We haven’t ridden any of these new components yet but it does seem impressive that the Italian masters have managed to pare about 100 grams or 5% from the approximate 2,000g weight of the 2009 groupset, down to under 1,900 grams for 2011, assuming we’re fitting the optional titanium version of the Ultra Torque bottom bracket.



If it was all about weight saving we would scoff as we normally do about super light components but in the case of Campagnolo we need to take seriously that in redesigning their internals very much in the Dave Brailsford ‘marginal gains’ vein, they’ve aimed to improve the very thing that most riders would notice next after lifting a Super Record equipped bike with an appreciative whistle.



The speed and feel of the gear shifts is the area where die-hard fans might argue that the Campagnolo ‘clunk’ was its best feature, signifying positivity and durability. But for many, though, a ‘snick’, and a super fast one at that, is what they’re looking for. We’re looking forward to trying.



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Campagnolo 2011 Super Record Ergopower Ultra Shift levers ● 330g ● approx 10g lighter ● new composite body with revised cable routing ● insert available for larger hands ● hoods available in black, white or red.



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Campagnolo 2011 Super Record Chainset ● 680g with standard BB or 640g with optional titanium BB ● Completely new eXtreme Performance Shift System (XPSS) chainrings with 8 chain upshift zones and 2 chain downshift zones ● Optional titanium Ultra Torque axles ● Reverse thread titanium fixing bolt.



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Campagnolo 2011 Super Record Front Derailleur ● 72g for braze-on ● 3g lighter ● Ultra-shift carbon outer cage.



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Campagnolo 2011 Super Record Brakes ● 272g ● Rear now available optionally with more powerful dual pivot mechanism to match front ● New shoe fitting system ● longer pad in new compound.

  • channing davis

    You want the clunk to stay (as do I), but you wish for them to go electric (which I feel is akin to driving an automatic Ferrari)….. bikes are meant to be manual, that is part of the entire experience and joy of pedalling and shifting…..

  • Arwel

    Looks exciting, but when are Campagnolo going to go electronic? They have had prototypes for over 10 years! Also the time trial bar end shift levers are surely in need of a re-design. They’re so heavy. Finally, I hope the Campag ‘clunk’ will stay.