Mark Cavendish became upset after several journalists asked about Lance Armstrong at the team OmegaPharma-Quick Step presentation on Tuesday.



“There’s been reports that he’s confessed to doping but I haven’t seen any interviews yet, so until then I can’t really comment,” he said early on in the day



He added that he will be unable to watch the Armstrong interview with Oprah Winfrey. He said, “I’m travelling to Argentina at the time.”



But in an interview later, having been asked about Armstrong consistently through the day he became upset. ”**** off, seriously **** off if you’re asking about this,” Cavendish reportedly said. He turned to someone and said, “Can you get him away please? Please get this guy away. He just wants to talk about Lance, **** off.”



Giro unveils Paul Smith designed jerseys

The Giro d’Italia organiser on Monday unveiled the 2013 pink jersey and other leaders’ jerseys designed by Paul Smith.



Smith said in a press release, “It was an absolute honour and delight to be asked to design the four jerseys for the Giro and I hope that the simple approach that I’ve made is acceptable to you all; putting red piping with the pink, cleaning all of the jerseys up to keep them as simple as possible and adding a little drawing of a cyclist by myself onto the jerseys.”



In addition to the pink jersey, he applied his simple approach to the blue mountains jersey, the white young rider jersey and the red points jersey. His signature on the jerseys’ collar and his stripes on the left sleeve.



Smith joins other famous designers, like Dolce & Gabbana, who have put their touch on Italy’s Grand Tour.





Hunt helps launch team in Azerbaijan

Jeremy Hunt, after retiring with team Sky, takes up the head sports director roll with Azerbaijan’s Synergy-Baku team.



“I really didn’t think that I would be back in cycling so soon after my retirement, but when I was offered the Baku Racing Project role, it was too good an opportunity to be missed,” Hunt said in a press release. “Working with young athletes and helping them to achieve their goals and become professional bike riders is what I enjoy.”



The Synergy was unofficially launched yesterday. It will race in the third division with the aim of getting an Azeri rider to the Rio Games in 2016.



The team includes six local riders, Brit David Clarke, Ireland’s David McCann and Connor McConvey. In addition to team captain, McCann will be the team’s performance analyst.



David McQuaid, son of UCI president, Pat, was asked by the Azeri Federation to head the project last year at the World Championships. He said he was delighted to team with McCann and Hunt.



“Jeremy wants to get into the coaching and development side of things,” McQuaid said. “He will pay specific attention to the six Azeri riders, their race and training programme.”



“A hands on job is doesn’t scare me,” Hunt said. I will take them “to my base in Melbourne and train and test them, to make them suffer and ultimately get them into the best shape of their cycling lives before the Tour de Azerbaijan at the start of May, which ultimately is a huge goal for the team.”



Along with Azerbaijan, the team will mostly race on the Asian tour for the first half of the year.



Amstel Gold finish to mimic Worlds


The Amstel Gold Race this spring will use the same finish line that Philippe Gilbert crossed to win his World Championship title. The Dutch one-day race will continue after the Cauberg climb along the flat in Valkenburg.



According to local reports, the race will feature 33 climbs, including four times up the Cauberg, to make nearly 4000 metres of climbing.



The organiser also extended its contract with the start city Maastricht and Valkenburg for the next five years, through 2017.

This article is from

Cycling Weekly – In print and online, Cycling Weekly is the best source of breaking news, race reportage, reliable fitness advice, trustworthy product reviews and inspirational features. First published in 1891, the magazine has an amazing and unrivalled heritage, having been at the heart of British cycling for over 120 years.

Subscribe to Cycling Weekly in print » | Read the digital edition »

  • Patrick MCKEOWN

    Armstrong is just a low life cheat liar crook fraudster call him what you want
    I just feel sorry for all the other pros he let down and cheated them of all their glory whilst he was just cheating g his way he needs to go to jail for all the lies and deceit he has caused
    To me he will always be a low life jumped up never come down out and out cheat
    Pro cycling can only get better
    Long live clean pro cycling

  • Mike Ellison

    MILLION-DOLLAR BOY LOVES-IN BILLION-DOLLAR GIRL

    I missed the first part of the LA Apologia and only by chance happened to tune in to part 2. To me it felt utterly false; Winfrey trying to pass herself off as a serious interviewer with gravitas and Armstrong trying to pass himself off as a sincere penitent. Punch and Judy. I didn’t believe either of them; they were just counting their appearance money. The last straw came after about three minutes when he said his most humbling moment was when Livestrong sacked him. It should have been when he saw the look in the eyes of his children standing before him and trying not to look heartbroken when they realised their Dad, their idol, was just a cheap little crook, a liar, a bully, and a cheat. They are the ones he really let down. Every sporting cyclist with anything between their ears knew the truth all along. Two hours to say sorry??? Mr Bad suddenly becomes Mr Sad??? Please!!! I knew I was being had. I switched off – and how easy I found it to do!Unfortunately now I don’t know if I missed what should have been the real point of the exercise.

    As his body was always full of dope he must have managed to hide a large number of failed drug tests. A scam of this magnitude required complicity at the very top. He must have paid out a lot of money to a lot of people. Who to? UCI? WADA? USADA? Drug Labs? A N Other? And where were Verbruggen and McQuaid while all this was going on? Is anyone investigating them?

    I had already heard that he did not name any names. If true, this would mean that he obeyed omerta, the code of silence, where crooks protect each other. Since I switched off I don’t know if I missed any revelations. Therefore could you consider running an article containing any such revelations if they exist, and at the same time refuting the whole shabby exercise, and proposing a petition for further investigation? That would be a much greater service to cycling than Winfrey’s utter juvenile tripe.

  • robin oliver-tasker

    Hearing Armstrong trying to justify his actions on the Oprah show made me feel angry and disgusted. It was a studied insult to the many thousands of amateur cyclists, as well as professionals the world over, who don’t take performance enhancing substances. The man is nothing but a fraud, a cheat who does not deserve any consideration for his actions in duping the world of cycling for so long.

    He is not the only one. That the likes of Contador for instance is allowed to continue racing as a professional makes the governing body look weak and foolish to say the least. How can we take take the UCI seriously when this is allowed to take take place. Again I say Contador is not the only one.

    Like many in the cycling community, I have to say that for Amstrong to gone on as long as he did without being brought to book makes me feel very wary of the way he has been dealt with by those who govern the sport. Was there collusion? The UCI says not but can we trust it? There are still many questions unanswered.

    There has been irreparable harm done the credibility of professional cycling and this can only cascade down to the ranks of the millions of amateurs racing week in week out whether in a time trial on the O2 or in a road race league somewhere in Lincolnshire. Armstrong’s pathetic attempts to justify himself can only add to the image of cycling as a sport that is deeply tainted in the eyes of the general public.

    It is no good for the UCI to appear wringing it’s hands after the event, it must act quickly and courageously and issue life time bans on anyone found guilty of cheating by the use of drugs, blood doping etc. Until it does so the world of professional cycling will not be taken seriously.

    Robin Oliver-Tasker

  • Ken Evans

    Will / have the Armstrong Tour stage “wins” been cancelled ? If so who “won” the stages ? How does the number of Tour stages wins by Cav compare to Armstrong ? As for “journalists”, if they aren’t able to ask Cav a decent question, then they aren’t very good at their job.

  • Terry

    Go on Cav- give it to ‘em straight between the eyes, I know how you feel.
    BTW- Lance who ? he no longer exists in my universe.

  • Ian Roberts

    Typical ‘Dignified’ Cavendish comments. He has a masterful grasp of the English language.