With June upon us, the cycling world now turns its attention towards France and the Critérium du Dauphiné, with the Tour de France on the horizon.

The Dauphiné is traditionally seen as the last major warm up before the Tour, a reliable indication as to the form of the favourites. Finishing just off the pace of the leader is generally considered the mark of perfect form, and this is generally where Lance Armstrong used to rank during his now-disgraced era as Tour champion, and during Albero Contador’s run of Tour success he finished between second and sixth.

The theory is that the Dauphiné is too close to the Tour to build up enough form if you finish way down on the general classification, but victory would suggest a premature peak. But, while this seemed to be the case for the likes of Alejandro Valverde, Levi Leipheimer and Christophe Moreau in the recent editions won by them, Bradley Wiggins’ Tour and Dauphiné double last season bucked the trend.

He became the first rider in nine years to win both races in the same season, and may set a benchmark for this year’s Dauphiné. The Tour favourites have been racing hard against each other as early as February this season in a trend that could be ascribed to Wiggins’s haul of stage race wins prior to winning the Tour last year. Where in the past riders feared showing their hand to early in races like the Dauphiné, this year could see them competing wholeheartedly for the win.

Bradley Wiggins will not make it three consecutive victories at the Dauphiné as he continues to rest following the Giro d’Italia, however Sky will be led by Chris Froome.

Froome will not have the usual prologue to stamp his authority in the race, as the organisers have opted for a hilly stage in Champéry to open the race this year. Monday and Tuesday’s stages are similarly undulating, and present opportunities for riders to breakaway while making it difficult for sprinters teams to control.

Stage four will likely be the first major shake up to the GC, with a 32.5 kilometre flat time-trial from Villars-les-Dombes to Parc des Oiseaux in what will be an important if not decisive stage.

The peloton then heads east towards the Alps, where they will tackle the Hors category Valmorel in the race’s first mountain top finish, but the mountains in Friday’s stage to Grenoble occur to early on the route to affect the GC.

The final weekend looks set to provide a thrilling finale. L’Alpe d’Huez will be climbed in stage seven on route to another uphill finish atop the intriguingly placed category three Superdévoluy, coming as it does immediately after the category one accent to and descent from Col du Noyer, while stage eight’s features two final category one climbs, with the Montée de Rinsoul finish to play host to the final showdown.

The route provides plenty of opportunities for the big names to show their hand, so hopefully we’ll see a race full of quality and aggressive racing.



Critérium du Dauphiné 2013: Stages

Stage Date From To Dist Type Profile Report Photos
Stage 1 Sun June 2 Champery Champery 121km Medium mountains >>>

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Stage 2 Mon June 3 Chatel Oyonnax 191km Sprint

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Stage 3 Tues June 4 Amberieu-en-Bugey Tarare 167km Sprint

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Stage 4 Weds June 5 Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux 32.5km ITT >>>

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Stage 5 Thurs June 6 Gresy-sur-Aix Valmorel 139km Medium mountains >>>

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Stage 6 Fri June 7 La Lechere Grenoble 143km Sprint

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Stage 7 Sat June 8 Le Pont-de-Claix Superdevoluy 187.5km Medium mountains >>>

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Stage 8 Sun June 9 Sisteron Risoul 155.5km Medium mountains >>>

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Critérium du Dauphiné 2013: Teams

Ag2r La Mondiale (France)

Argos-Shimano (Germany)

Astana (Kazakhstan)

Blanco (Netherlands)

BMC Racing Team (USA)

Bretagne – Seche Environment (France)

Canondale (Italy)

Cofidis (France)

Euskaltel-Euskadi (Spain)

FDJ-Big Mat (France)

Garmin-Sharp (USA)

Katusha (Russia)

Lampre-Merida (Italy)

Lotto-Belisol (Belgium)

Movistar (Spain)

Netapp Endura (Germany)

Omega Pharma-QuickStep (Belgium)

Orica-GreenEdge (Australia)

Radioshack-Nissan (Luxembourg)

Saxo-Tinkoff (Denmark)

Sky (Great Britain)

Vacansoleil-DCM (Netherlands)




Critérium du Dauphiné 2013: Recent winners

2012 Bradley Wiggins (GBR) Team Sky

2011 Bradley Wiggins (GBR) Team Sky

2010 Janez Brajkovic (Slo) RadioShack

2009 Alejandro Valverde (Spa) Caisse d’Epargne

2008 Alejandro Valverde (Spa) Caisse d’Epargne

2007 Christophe Moreau (Fra) Ag2r Prevoyance

2006 Levi Leipheimer (USA) Gerolsteiner*

2005 Inigo Landaluze (Spa) Euskaltel-Euskadi

2004 Iban Mayo (Spa) Euskaltel-Euskadi

2003 Lance Armstrong (USA) US Postal**

* Leipheimer stripped of result after USADA investigation

** Armstrong stripped of result after USADA investigation

Criterium du Dauphine 2013: Stage reports

Stage eight: Chris Froome wins 2013 Criterium du Dauphine

Stage seven: Sanchez attacks to win


Stage six: Voeckler wins as Froome holds onto lead


Stage five: Froome stamps authority with mountains stage win


Stage four: Martin wins as Dennis takes lead


Stage three: Boasson Hagen wins sprint


Stage two: Viviani sprints to win

Stage one: Veilleux wins opener



Related links

Critérium du Dauphiné 2013 Coverage index

Wiggins wins 2012 Critérium du Dauphiné

Froome: “Dauphine is mini Tour”



External links

Official website

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