Alex Dowsett soloed to his first professional victory in the final stage of the Tour du Poitou Charentes in Poitiers this afternoon.

The 22-year-old Sky rider also moved up to second overall, his highest-placed GC finish in his career to date.

Dowsett initially broke clear with team-mates Greg Henderson, Jeremy Hunt and Mick Rogers in a move which split the peloton up into several groups.

He then attacked from the breakaway with around 5km to go, and used his famed time trialling skills to withstand the chasing peloton.

In truth, the bunch never looked like catching the 22-year-old, who won by six seconds.

His Sky team-mate Davide Appollonio, winner of the opening stage, won the bunch sprint for second.

Dowsett started the morning in fourth place overall, just a second off the podium, but jumped up to second by virtue of time bonuses and his advantage at the finish.

RadioShack’s Jesse Sergent took the overall win, with another Shack rider – Michal Kwiatkowski – completing the podium.

Results

Tour du Poitou Charentes, stage five: Saint-Jacques de Thouars-Poitiers, 171.4km

1. Alex Dowsett (GBr) Team Sky in 4-03-15


2. Davide Appollonio (Ita) Team Sky at 6 sec

3. Moreno Hofland (Ned) Rabobank

4. Ion Izagiree (Spa) Euskatel-Euskatel

5. Yauheni Hutarovich (Blr) Movistar all at st.

Final overall classification

1. Jesse Sergent (Nzl) RadioShack in 15-14-40


2. Alex Dowsett (GBr) Team Sky at 18 sec

3. Michal Kwiatkowski (Pol) RadioShack at st

4. Jean Christophe Peraud (Fra) Ag2r-La Mondiale at 36 sec

5. Martin Elmiger (Sui) Ag2r-La Mondiale at 39sec

Brits

69. Jeremy Hunt (GBr) Team Sky at 3-56

115. Peter Kennaugh (GBr) Team Sky at 16-48

Alex Dowsett wins Tour du Poitou Charentes stage five

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