Emma Egan released from prison two years into a four-year jail sentence for killing cyclist Eric Codling
- Cyclist's family are campaigning for change in sentencing

A drunk driver who killed a cyclist after losing control of her car while speeding, then left the scene of the incident, has been released from jail after serving two years of a four-year jail sentence. The cyclist’s family are now campaigning for a change in sentencing for such cases.

Emma Egan was convicted of causing death by dangerous driving in July 2014 after hitting and killing cyclist Eric Codling in Whirlow, Sheffield, and sentenced for four years. However, Codling’s family have been told that Egan was released from prison after two years, reports Sheffield’s Star.

Codling was out cycling on a Sunday morning in November 2013 when he was hit by Egan. Egan had been pursuing her boyfriend in her car after an argument. She had been drinking the night before and was travelling at 70mph in a 40mph zone.

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Egan lost control of the vehicle, striking Codling, who died of his injuries. Egan left the scene of the incident and was later found by police at her boyfriend’s home.

Codling was 55 at the time of his death, and left a wife and two daughters.

Egan served six months in a secure prison, before being moved to an open prison. After two years she has been released and is serving the remainder of her sentence in the community.

Codling’s wife, Karen, is campaigning for a change in sentencing laws, and told the Star: “When the judge said six years and then took 25 per cent off for her pleading guilty, for me that was ridiculous. There was no way she could have done anything else but plead guilty.

“When they said four years, I knew she would be out in two – is that really how much Eric’s life was worth?”

Karen Codling continued: “It doesn’t feel like she has been punished, with only a few months in a proper prison then going into an open prison with days out. How is that a deterrent? The consequences aren’t that serious.”

Codling’s family have joined calls for sentencing guidelines for careless and dangerous driving to be changed, with longer sentences for the worst offenders.

Egan had previously lost her own sister to a drunk driver, who was also sentenced to four years.