Milan-San Remo never had one in 100 years, but now it has two Australian winners: Matt Goss and Simon Gerrans. Gerrans repeated Goss’ success today in the Italian classic and gave team GreenEdge its first big classic win.

“It’s Absolutely incredible,” Goss told Cycling Weekly of his team-mate’s win. “Another Australian win, an important one for GreenEdge.”

Gerrans followed with Fabian Cancellara (RadioShack-Nissan) after Vincenzo Nibali (Liquigas-Cannondale) launched an attack on the final Poggio climb. In the final 6.2 kilometres, he stuck to the wheels of cycling’s most renowned descenders and positioned himself for the sprint along seaside.

It was touch and go because the trio only had seven seconds ahead of the final kilometre. Gerrans calculated his move, just as he calculated the stages leading to his Tour Down Under overall win in January.

Goss placed 15th. Last year, he sprinted to win out of a group that worked its way free on the Le Mànie climb with just under 100 kilometres to race.

Once Mark Cavendish (Sky) was dropped – 2-30 minutes back at 40km to race – GreenEdge worked its plan. Goss would stay in the group to sprint and Gerrans would cover attacks.

Gerrans’ win gives GreenEdge its first big classic, one of cycling’s five monuments. He also led the team in January. It faced criticism early in the Tour Down Under, but Gerrans finished second and took the lead on the Willunga Hill stage. He clinched the overall the following day.

GreenEdge debut marks Australia’s first team to race in cycling’s top division.

“No,” sports director Matt White responded when asked if he could have asked for a better start. “Winning Tour Down Under at home and Milan-San Remo, what more could you want?”

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Gerrans wins Milan-San Remo

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  • Eric

    the Aussies are killing it this year. Good stuff!

  • Ken Evans

    Aussie winter = early season form.

  • roginoz

    Wow.those grapes you get sure are sour Dave.Would this be because Cavo was out of it? No one rider owns the road ( apart maybe from EDDY in his day!! ).In fact most sprints are won by wheelsucking not from the FRONT ALL THE WAY.Cancellara is a great rider ,I would have loved for him to win but fair play to Gerro for outwitting him and I am not saying this because he comes from Mansfield ( VICTORIA ) 90 Min from Albury NSW where I live!! In fact my HOME riders are Geraint and Nicole.

  • PeterLB

    Ah Dave, that old one. Maybe next year all the riders should have to ride shoulder to shoulder, not draft, and see who gets to the finish line first – now that would be a great race! Or, better still, set them off individually, maybe at two minute intervals, and get them to ride the course alone! We could call it, I dunno, a ‘trial by time’, or something.

    It was a road race Dave. Everyone could see Cancellara was the strongest rider there, but it takes more than that to win a race. Gerrans was brilliant for riding to his strengths. It takes MASSIVE balls to sit on and refuse to do a turn when 20 riders are baring down on you from behind. His only chance to win was to gamble that Cancellara would drag him to the line. And he did. He didn’t have to of course, he could have sat up, but he didn’t have the balls to do that.

    Gerrans deserves the win for outsmarting Cancellara. Had he done a couple of big turns he knew he wouldn’t have won the sprint. His aim was to win, so he didn’t do the turns. two different riders using different tactics to win a race. Utterly Brilliant.

    Bike racing has never been about honesty, it’s about strength, tactics, brains, and a bit of luck. Gerrans had them all yesterday and was a deserving winner. Well done Simon!

    Peter

  • Tom Adams

    As I saw it, each of the three leaders had a separate moment to take the race:

    As good a descender as Nibbles is, he was never going to overtake Sapartacus on the descent, nor outsprint Gerrans; thus he had to distance the other two by the top of the Poggio or his race was over.

    Cancellara timed his effort well on the Poggio, but must’ve known that he had to get away from Gerrans before the flat. His frustration showed in the last kilometre, trying to get the others to take a turn.

    As for Gerrans, all he had to do was stick on Cancellara’s wheel (no easy task) and sit it out ’til the sprint. Why on earth would he do anything apart from let him tow him to the line?

    T

  • dave smith

    Milano -Sanremo – great race – poor victor !

    Gerrans wins by wheel sucking Cancellara from the top of the Poggio – not much of a victory was it Simon?

    About time the race finished on the Via Roma again, which has a slight gradient and makes for a much better finish – boo to Gerrans – Cancellara robbed again,

    Dave, Dagenham ,London