Following the recent launch of the Propel, Giant UK has released details of the limited edition bikes that will be available in April/May of 2013.

Just 100 of the Propel Advanced SL 3 will be brought into the UK in advance of the 2014 product year when a full range of both Propel and Envie bikes will be available.

The women’s version of the Propel, the Envie, will be available at the same time and limited to 40 units. To start with, the Envie will come in the Advanced 2 version, featuring the same tube shapes but without the ISP seatpost. With the integrated brakes coming in an alloy version and the rest of the bike featuring Shimano 105, the Envie Advanced 2 to our minds offers pretty astounding value at £2,199, it’ll be in available in just one colour. 

The sleek-looking black, white and red Propel (men’s) frame incorporates all the technical features of the top-end SL Zero machine, it only misses out on the Contact SLR Aero Integrated bar/stem, which are exchanged for the more conventional set up of separate Contact SLR aero bar and SLR stem, the carbon brakes are also swapped for alloy.

According to Giant’s testing the Integrated stem is worth five watts at zero degree’s of yaw so you’re not missing out on too much drag reduction.

A full Shimano Ultegra groupset covers the bike but for the brakes which are TRP manufactured alloy units, like on the Envie and an obvious aero part of the frame.

All importantly, Giant specs its own wheels in the form of the P-SLR1, a key to getting the most out of the frame aerodynamically speaking as they were used for the wind tunnel testing. Expect to pay £4,499 and to get your order in quickly.

More info: www.giant-bicycles.com





Giant Propel Advanced SL 3





Giant Envie Advanced SL 2

Related links



Giant launches new Propel and Envie aero road bikes

This article is from

Cycling Weekly – In print and online, Cycling Weekly is the best source of breaking news, race reportage, reliable fitness advice, trustworthy product reviews and inspirational features. First published in 1891, the magazine has an amazing and unrivalled heritage, having been at the heart of British cycling for over 120 years.

Subscribe to Cycling Weekly in print » | Read the digital edition »