Cycling Weekly will have a rider blogging from every round of this year’s Tour Series, offering insight, comment and humour from the fast-paced proceedings.

Former Welsh circuit race champion and all-round Rhys Lloyd gives us an honest account of round seven of this year’s event in London’s Canary Wharf.

As a team, we like being at the Tour Series, we’re happy to get stuck in, and the boys always pull in the same direction.
To the naked eye, our riders may not look as serious as some of those in the top teams, but believe me, we’re always trying to mix it with them and get as high up the table as possible.

I was quite looking forward to the race, as the Tour Series rounds are a good way of getting a good quality block of racing in the legs. Having ridden the first couple, and then headed over the Ras, so I was coming off the back of a good but hard eight days of racing. I had good sensations in the legs last week and I was hopeful of recovering in time.

After a stage race, the Canary Wharf round is a nice one to break your way back in. It’s not a lion’s den – it’s a fairly simple circuit, it’s about speed and you have to use your head. I admit that, as I’m quite small and only 60kg, I prefer the more technical courses – those with a few more corners and a little climb on it.

I came across from South Wales in the early morning, so I had a day in the car. But, after working up a sweat on the rollers and a few Paddy and Scotts coffees from Gibby [Tony Gibb] and I was fit to go.

We tried to get stuck in last night to help Marcel [Six]
close in on the sprints jersey. I think he’s had a bit of a tough time
from the Raleigh boys. I think it’s time for us to give a bit back to
them! 

It was really quick out there, and ultimately I hadn’t recovered enough from last week. I was a victim of the elastic band effect – if you’re not in the first 10, that band is continuously stretching then coming back, stretching them coming back. A few riders snapped before me, and then I was at the back of that band. About 30 minutes in it was my turn, and that was it.