THE revised edition of the Highway Code is to be amended to make it clear it is not compulsory for cyclists to use cycle lanes.
?We?re delighted that the Minister has decided to make these changes to the Highway Code; it now makes clear that cyclists have every right to be on the road,? said Richard George, CTC campaigner.

The original version of the Highway Code had contained two ambiguous rules which could have led to cyclists being held partly liable if hit by cars while not using a cycle facility.

A barrage of 11,000 emails from angry CTC members crashed the computer system at the Driving Standards Agency, responsible for the new wording.

This was followed by an independent online petition of 20,000 signatures demanding the wording be changed.

The government finally agreed to make the changes to the Highway Code following a high profile campaign this past month, led by CTC president Kevin Mayne and his transport campaigners lobbying Ministers and Lords.
The proposed revisions are:

Rule 61: Cycle Facilities. Use cycle routes, advanced stop lines, cycle boxes and toucan crossings unless at the time it is unsafe to do so. Use of these facilities is not compulsory and will depend on your experience and skills, but they can make your journey safer.

Rule 63: Cycle Lanes. These are marked by a white line (which may be broken) along the carriageway. When using a cycle lane, keep within the lane when practicable. When leaving a cycle lane check before pulling out that it is safe to do so and signal your intention clearly to other road users. Use of these facilities is not compulsory and will depend on your experience and skills, but they can make your journey safer.

The Department for Transport will hold a short consultation to confirm that groups are satisfied with the final wording before going to print.
The CTC is asking cyclists to sign an online petition to show support.

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