The Lee Valley VeloPark – which includes the iconic London 2012 Velodrome and BMX track – will open to the public on March 4, it was announced this morning.

As part of the opening programme, the velodrome will welcome back some of the heroes of last summer’s Games by hosting the two-day finale of the Revolution Series on March 14 and 15.

In addition to the Olympic velodrome and a slightly-ammended BMX course, a floodlit
1.6-kilometre road circuit is currently being built on the site of the former
Eastway track, which was demolished to make way for the Olympics. Eight kilometres of mountain bike trails will also be included.

Lee Valley Regional Park Authority will run and own the facility, and its chief executive Shaun Dawson predicted the VeloPark will be offer people the opportunity to “learn to ride, set world records and everything in between.”

Beginners will have the opportunity to hire one of 250 Condor bikes for use at the VeloPark, with Dawson saying that the competitive price structure to use the site has a “community focus and is commerically driven.”

Clubs could pay as little as £2 a head to race on the new road circuit, with access to the velodrome potentially as little as £4. “The pricing reflects the nature of the asset,” Dawson added. 

The Velodrome has also been chosen as the venue for Britain’s bid to host the 2016 UCI Track World Championships, with a decision on the successful applicant expected within the next couple of months.

To view the price structure for the Lee Valley VeloPark, click here (external link).





The Lee Valley VeloPark velodrome this morning – ready to be raced on again…





…but the 1.6-kilometre road circuit is still under construction.





Here’s how the site will look once it is finished.

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