For those with no choice but to ride even in high winds, here is the Senior Operational Meteorologist's advice on cycling during Storm Imogen


Southern Britain is being battered by near-100mph winds as Storm Imogen blows in off the Atlantic. The worst hit areas are the South West of England, South and Mid Wales and the Midlands.

The Met Office has issued an amber wind warning for some areas in the south of the UK, stretching from the Isles of Scilly to London. The strongest gust was recorded off The Needles, Isle of Wight.

>>> Watch: Riders blown over by strong winds, race abandoned

Looking ahead to the evening commute, when many people have no other option but to cycle – and some are determined to ride even when an alternative is available – here’s what the Met Office says about riding in strong winds.

If you do ride whatever the weather, make sure your bike is as prepared as you are 

“A steady strong wind, while being hard work, will not be as hazardous as a blustery wind,” says Jay Merrell, Senior Operational Meteorologist at the Met Office.

“A sudden gust (especially a cross-wind, perpendicular to the direction of travel) can result in a significant change in the affect the wind is having on the cyclist’s body, possible resulting in a brief loss of control which, in a worst case scenario, could result in the cyclist crashing, or veering into traffic,” he continued.

“During blustery winds it is essential the cyclist maintains full concentration and full control of the bike.”

Personal chocie and common sense are what it comes down to, but sometimes leaving the bike at work and jumping on the train could be the safer and more sensible option.

  • Karl Windle

    Should of bought her another wkd then, fnarr fnarr.

  • dannybuoy

    I almost got blown off this weekend.