Geraint Thomas didn’t start the final stage of Paris-Nice today having returned to the UK to turn his attention immediately back to the track.

In an indication of the hectic program the Welshman is following this year, Thomas will be back on the Manchester track on Monday afternoon after a hard week helping Bradley Wiggins win one of the most prestigious stage races on the calendar.

“Some people have already said to ‘man up, it’s only 10km’. But from the coaches point of view, I will have little to gain doing that sort of effort today,” Thomas said on his website.

“I start track training again Monday afternoon, so a nice easy rest day will help rather than 10km flat out up a mountain. I still would have liked to finish and be there with the boys. Especially if Brad has a flyer and finishes it off. But the track is my goal this year and everything is for that. No compromise!”

Thomas is following the same racing and track programme this year as he did in 2011 as it brought him in to great shape for the track worlds.  While the likes of Ed Clancy, Steven Burke, Peter Kennaugh and Ben Swift are riding a more track-focused program, Thomas has been given the freedom to mix both.

His next race will be the world track championships in early April (meaning he’ll miss the classics) where the British team will look to wrestle back the team pursuit world title from the Australians in Melbourne.

Thomas has been a key member of the British team pursuit squad since 2006, and it’s his strength – gained from his road racing program – that shores up the team in the final kilometre.

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