We round up our favourite cycling-related YouTube clips of the year.

It’s nearly Christmas, so grab an eggnog, kick back and relax with our pick of the year’s best cycling clips.

Please note that some of the material may not be suitable for minors.

In no particular order…



Orica-GreenEdge – Call Me Maybe. We forgot all about the dodgy mission statements and pre-season posturing as soon as we saw this clip, which proves that the Aussie squad knows how to have fun as well as win races.



Martyn Ashton – Road Bike Party. Mountain bike trials rider Ashton spent decades fiddling around with knobbly tyres before getting a proper audience with his stunning road bike film. Over six million views and counting.



Martyn Ashton – Road Bike Party out-takes. For anyone who watched the original version, it’s good to see that Ashton is actually human after all.



Bradley Wiggins – Tour de Romandie press conference. Absolutely classic Wiggins post-race press conference, playing the part of the uppity Brit abroad with some style. He went on to win the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award.



S**t Cyclists Say. This will have you nodding/cringeing in recognition. WARNING: Contains swearing



Waiting for green. This is how to track stand at traffic lights.



Keith Lemon meets GB cyclists. Only Keith could ask Lizzie Armitstead whether she is ‘smoothly shaved like a dolphin’.



Peter Sagan signs a fan. Tour de France green jersey victor Sagan signs a girl’s breast and then asks a reporter to send him the video. “It’s good, ha ha”. We hope he didn’t use a fountain pen



Tyler Farrar storms the Argos-Shimano bus at the Tour de France after crashing for the third consecutive day. He just wanted a quiet word with Tom Veelers



Paul Sherwen says a bad word. But it’s by accident. Probably. WARNING: Contains swearing

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