Russell Downing (CandiTV-Marshalls Pasta) was best British finisher at the end of Tour of Britain stage three in Gretna Green, finishing sixth behind some fast sprinters.



Downing has been close to the front on two stages now and only missed out in Newcastle because of the fighting for position. He is now eighth overall, 25 seconds behind Boasson Hagen but he has not given up hope of adding success in the Tour of Britain to his win at the Tour of Ireland.

“I had good legs and felt strong but I was trapped in the right hand gutter waiting to go,” he told Cycling Weekly after the finish.



“I think Geraint [Thomas] was leading Merlo out and they were battling with [Alexander] Kristoff. As soon the sprint started I whipped round the left and got a few people back but it was a bit late.”



“My legs felt a lot better. I dropped my saddle on my new bike a millimetre before the stage and I could feel the difference and felt back to normal. I’m a lot happier now and optimistic for the rest of the race. I know I’m climbing well enough to be up there in Europe and so I want to have a shot at overall.”

Related links



Stage three: Hagen does it again in Gretna



Stage two: Dutchman Reus wins second stage


Stage one: Sutton wins opening stage



Tour of Britain 2009: Cycling Weekly’s coverage index



Can a British rider win the Tour of Britain?



British pros head home to fight for Worlds places



Halfords hit the Tour of Britain



Rapha-Condor names Tour of Britain squad



Cavendish to miss Tour of Britain



Katusha and Rabobank announce Tour of Britain teams



Tour of Britain and Tour Series on ITV4



Tour of Britain 2009 route unveiled

 

Cycling Weekly April 17 2014 issue
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