Spanish rider Alejandro Valverde has given his reaction to the Court of Arbitration for Sport’s decision to ban him from competition for two years: “I will be back”.

“I will serve out the ban and I will come back,” Valverde told Spanish paper Marca, according to news agency AFP, signalling his intention to return to cycling when his two-year suspension expires on December 31, 2011.

“They will not bury me, as certain people would like to do,” Valverde continued defiantly.

Valverde was handed a two-year suspension by CAS on Monday for use of banned blood-boosting drug erythropoietin (EPO).

In May 2009, Valverde had received a two-year ban from competing in Italy by the Italian Olympic Committee after it had ascertained that blood containing EPO found during the Operacion Puerto doping bust matched DNA taken from a blood sample given by Valverde during the 2008 Tour de France when it visited Italy.

All of Valverde’s results for the 2010 season will be annulled, including his ‘wins’ at the Tour of the Mediterranean, Tour of Romandy and Tour of the Basque Country. He will also have to repay any prize money won this season.

Valverde had been topping the Union Cycliste Internationale’s World Ranking, but his name has now been removed from the list and his points redistributed to other riders.

Related links



Valverde suspended for two years



16 March 2010: Valverde faces worldwide ban after losing appeal against Italian suspension



19 June 2009: Valverde appeals against Italian ban



11 May 2009: Valverde banned from racing in Italy for two years

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  • Malcolm Mason

    If he hadn’t cheated, all the problems with the various cycling bodies would be irrelevant. A ban of two years simply isn’t long enough; five years might make riders think twice about defrauding us the viewing public, sponsors and their team-mates.

  • Ken Evans

    “….surely some of the blame must lie within Spains legal and cycling bodies.
    They have constantly refused to cooperate with the UCI etc
    which leads people to believe that the impications of the Fuente affair had far reaching effects
    outwith cycling and dare I say it government sanction, or protectors at the highest level.”

    There is a bad smell about the Spanish lack of action.

  • Frederick

    John, fairly romantizised view of the sport there. You might want to check in to Valve Piti’s family life before you start using it as any sort of sympathy points scoring strategy.

    The man cheated and has finally been caught. All the details are down to beaurocracy, inter organisational squabbling, unworkable laws and ego, and could be argued over forever.

  • Dave

    I think that like most people a ban was required but whilst I have some sympathy for him due to the fact that it took various bodies some 4 years to get to this point and then to have a seemingly harsher ban than his predecessors, surely some of the blame must lie within Spains legal and cycling bodies.
    They have constantly refused to cooperate with the UCI etc which leads people to believe that the impications of the Fuente affair had far reaching effects outwith cycling and dare I say it government sanction, or protectors at the highest level.
    Do to him and all his supporters direct your ire at your own non cooperating bodies.

  • John Calliott

    I’m fine with the ban. I’d be fine with them stripping him of titles during the time he’s suspected of cheating. I watched him race Contador at Paris-Nice in tough conditions, and no one claims that he was cheating, or violating any rules. He was away from his family, riding on dangerous roads where he could have gotten hurt, and now the results were stripped and he’d have been better off home on the couch with the family, because those months of his life were pretty much wasted. And the UCI has the arrogance to say they’re making an example of him, when it was actually CONI who made the whole case, and the Biological Passport did nothing? Pat McQuaid needs to go, soon..