We asked Cycling Weekly readers what cycling means to them: not the dictionary definition of 'cycling', but what extra dimension it brings to their life


The freedom, fun and fitness aspects of cycling mean different things to different people. Collect together any group of cyclists, and you’ll often get wildly different answers to why they ride, and what they get out of it.

For some it’s the ideal release from the stresses of work (or even home life), a way to unwind and relax. For others it’s a way of getting fit, sometimes alone and sometimes in the company of friends.

>>> Eight reasons why we started cycling, and why we should never forget them

There are few sports or past-times that can offer as much as cycling can. There are few people who can accurately claim that swimming, darts or hockey can provide them with a means of getting to work.

We recently asked Cycling Weekly readers what cycling meant to them, and here are a selection of their answers.

Feel free to add in your answer in the comment section below.

>>> 10 reasons why cycling to work is great

To me, cycling means getting outside and having fun, being free, getting away from everything into my own little world. It means dealing with depression and keeping a positive fighting attitude in all aspects of life. Cycling is more than just a sport or hobby, its a lifestyle and life changing thing to participate in. Cycling is life.
Richard Stripes

I love the fact that I never plan where I go on a ride. I just ride, if I want to turn left and see where it goes, I turn left and come back when I have had enough. Free as a bird and a bit of time to forget the pressures of life for a few hours.
Dave Pittman

What DOESN’T cycling mean to me?
Lauren Flanders

Riding in the open countryside: The definition of freedom

Riding in the open countryside: The definition of freedom

Simply freedom from the daily grind of life. Cycling keeps me fresh and feeling alive for the rigours of work each week.
Graham Davidson

Since taking up cycling in 2013, I am four and a half stone lighter, fitter than I have ever been in my 54 years and have discovered that I am quite good at climbing hills!
Susan Blackman

An addictive, low-cost form of transport which can lift your spirits and burn unwanted calories.
Kurt Green

Freedom, ease of travel, making friends, learning, wind, rain, sun on your skin. Views, chatting, silence, exhaustion, satisfaction, tan lines, addiction, gruelling, cake, thighs, pain, endorphins.
Joanne Thompson

Life. Independent freedom of movement. Good health. Fresh air. Sensible way to commute. Avoiding traffic. Enthusiasm for exercise outdoors. Trees. Wind in face. Fun.
David Chadderton

I ride to think. I ride to forget. Sometimes I just ride.
Terry Hudson

Watch: How to dress like a cyclist

Just getting out on my own and having some ‘me time’. The pleasure of being out on a beautiful morning and being surrounded by the great British landscape is one of the simplest but it’s also one of best.
Jennifer Boyle

Everything… But the ice cream at the end of the ride is the best!
Jolene DeFrank

It’s the only form of exercise that I look forward to rather than endure.
Fiona Franchi

Appreciating my part of the country in much more beautiful detail. Getting faster, making friends, getting fitter.
Mike Price

Money pit.
Andrew Cheetham

Cycling saved me from a downward spiral that saw me headed for 19 stone at a rapid rate. I suffered depression after the birth of both my kids and cycling really improves my mental health, keeps my weight in check and all round helps me cope with life.
Becky Trower

  • Jude Still

    a cycle and a camera and you see a different world

  • welshcyclist

    Cycling, and the words of other cyclists, racers, tourers, commuters, cyclocrossers, and mountain bikers, they all give me a perspective, that no matter how far the ride, steep the climb, harshness of the weather, I like them, can travel that distance, climb that climb, and survive that weather, all the while enjoying riding my bicycle.

  • Labann

    “Once bicycling and cycling were synonymous. Lately, they’ve developed separate connotations… bicycling is the generic term for propelling self on any bi-wheeled contraption, whereas cycling has come to mean racing an approved diamond-framed bike for sport, though for some riders the two remain indistinguishable. You know who they are by how rudely they pass. “Cyclist” could thus be used disparagingly, and often is by motorists.”-Labann, http://bike-n-chain.blogspot.com

  • cormac o’connor

    Getting to a place you never thought you could reach. Physically, mentally, geographically.

  • Andrew Bairsto

    Peace, no phone calls,no wife to pester you,freedom bliss.