Even though Sir Chris Hoy and Sarah Storey have also been nominated, Cycling Weekly believes cycling fans should back Bradley Wiggins in Sunday’s BBC Sports Personality of the Year vote.

Wiggins is aiming to become the third cyclist in five years to take the title. He is the unanimous favourite with bookmakers, and one-third of his SPOTY rivals have come out in support of him.

Still not convinced? Here are six reasons why CW feels Wiggins deserves to win the prize.

TOUR DE FRANCE WIN

What Wiggins did between June 30 and July 22 was unprecedented. Yes, he was the first British winner of the Tour, but there was more. He led for 13 days, longer than Miguel Indurain ever spent in the maillot jaune a single Tour. He became only the third Brit to win a time trial in the Tour de France, and the first to do so in yellow. His winning margin of 3-21 was the second biggest since 2006.

OLYMPIC TIME TRIAL

Equally as spectacular was his ride in the Olympic time trial 10 days after the Tour. Not only did his win give him his fourth Olympic gold (and seventh medal in total), it turned Wiggins into a national icon.



Wiggins sprints to win stage one in this year’s Tour of Romandy

THE REST OF HIS SEASON

Wiggins’s 2012 may be defined by the Tour and the Olympics. Yet if the award is a true recognition of an athlete’s year, then his victories in Paris-Nice, Tour of Romandy and the Critérium du Dauphiné – all WorldTour races – should not be overlooked.

PERSONALITY

From his drawing the raffle numbers quip on the Tour podium to his passionate anti-doping comments at a race press conference, very few sports men or women can match Wiggins’s ways.

GIVING SOMETHING BACK

Through his involvement with the Wiggle-Honda women’s team and his support for youngster Kieran Frend, he has used his Bradley Wiggins Foundation to help others. His “Ride with Brad” sportive will return in 2013, taking place in Lancashire on August 18.





Wiggins and Keiran Frend during the “Ride With Brad” sportive

HIS LEGACY

Thankfully, Wiggins will not be merely defined by his sideburns. His success in 2012 has inspired people to take up cycling, be it of the recreational or competitive nature. British Cycling signed up more members in the 10 days after the Tour than ever before.

* The award will be decided by a public vote during Sunday evening’s televised live show from London’s ExCeL Centre. Information on how to vote will be issued during the broadcast starting on BBC One at 7.30pm.

Related links


Help Wiggins win by a landslide



Bradley Wiggins heads BBC Sports Personality shortlist



Mark Cavendish wins BBC Sports Personality of the Year



Cavendish eager to win Sports Personality says Wiggins



Cavendish’s BBC SPOTY odds slashed by bookies



Cavendish and Clarke top bookies’ list for BBC SPOTY



Cavendish on BBC Sports Personality shortlist



Garner on BBC Young Sports Personality shortlist

 

  • John

    I won’t be voting because I think the BBC SPOTY is a load of nonsense. Confirmed when I read the Flying Scotsman by Graeme Obree. If I were to vote I’d be torn between Chris Hoy, Andy Murray and Bradley Wiggins. Not one of them doesn’t deserve such recognition.

  • Jimster

    Not only the best all round grafter/cyclist on the planet, but also has the bottle to tell a@$£ licking journo’s how it is, so much better than some of the sycophantic “celeberities” that infest the media. Oh and top geezer fom Kilburn with great taste in clothes and music!!!!

  • Roger Bisby

    I have been cycling for 48 years and British cycling is now enjoying the kind of success I never thought I would ever see. In the sixties we got wolf whistles now people understand what we are about and smile. That is due to Wiggins, Cavendish, Pendleton, Hoy and the rest of them. He gets my vote.

  • gg/gg

    He had done his credentials no good by announcing to upstage Froome in next years TdeF

  • Bill Neill

    So foul mouthed blubbering to the international press passes off for ‘personality’ in the national cycling weekly does it? If that’s the case then I would say that British cycling is in a far worst state than it thinks it is . . . Emperor’s got no clothes.