Your essential guide to what to look for when buying cycling lights

Unless you only ride during the day then cycling lights are essential all year round, but obviously far more in the Autumn and Winter when there are fewer hours of daylight.

There is increasingly talk in the cycling industry about lights being needed at all times, which is something to consider when conditions dictate the need for day time illumination.

Bright sunshine can be cited by motorists as a reason for not spotting a more vulnerable road user, a factor that can be negated by a set of bike lights switched on during the day to show where the rider is against the bright backdrop.

>>> Tips for cycling and training in the dark

New bikes are sold with reflectors and many people dress in high visibility clothing, which are good additions but in no way make up for a bike with no lights. Bicycle mounted illumination is essential for safety and to keep you on the right side of the law. A decent set of bike lights can be the difference between riding home safely or not getting there at all.

>>> Cyclists’ guide to high visibility clothing and accessories

The law regarding bike lights is governed by the Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations, first published in 1989 but amended six times since, which says that as well as your pedal reflectors and rear reflectors (the side and front reflectors aren’t actually a legal necessity) night-riders will also need lights front and back.

The lights have to be mounted on the bike centrally or to the offside, positioned up to 1.5m from the ground, and conform to British Safety or EC standards.

>>> Winter cycling survival guide: 10 tips to keep you riding

Both front or rear lights can be flashers, but if so they must emit at least four candela. “But bike lights tend to be rated in lumens or Watts, what’s a candela?,” we hear you cry.

It’s not a particularly easy subject to explain, and they’re not directly convertible units. But simply put: as long as you buy decent quality bike lights, fit them properly, and remember to switch them on, the law shouldn’t be a problem.

Our pick of the best cycling lights

bontrager ion 700 rt front light

Bontrager Ion 700 RT front light

With a claimed maximum output of 700 lumens, the Bontrager Ion 700 RT front light sits at about the brightness…

£109.99
Score 8

mytinysun folkslight

MyTinySun Folkslight

If you’re after a light that will get you through some pretty serious nighttime riding, and are willing to overlook…

£129.95
Score 7

bontrager flare r rear light

Bontrager Flare R rear light

When it comes to safety, having a good rear light is probably more important than having a good front light,…

£44.99
Score 10

Small and compact that Exposure Blaze still packs a punch

Exposure Blaze rear light

Exposure Blaze acts as a bright, compact and easy to use rear light which our tester liked.

£99.95
Score 8

knog blinder arc 640 front light

Knog Blinder ARC 640

Compared to many other front lights that cost less than £100, the Knog Blinder ARC 640 has a very sleek…

£89.99
Score 6

Hope-R4-LED

Hope R4 LED front light

Hope R4 LED front bike lights covers all your seeing needs at this time of year, whether that is on…

£250.00
Score 9

Moon ADJ-1300 Front Light: powerful light to keep you riding through the winter

Moon ADJ-1300 Front Light

If, like us, you’re having to plan your winter miles around the nine-to-five then it is nigh-on impossible to avoid…

£179.99
Score 8

What do you need to consider when buying your lights?

We’ll look at specialist lighting options in a moment, but for now, let’s assume you’re a road rider or commuter who wants to see and been seen when the sun sets. What do you need to consider when buying your lights?

>>> Cycling Weekly’s buyer’s guides: find the best kit for you

Most modern cycle lights use LEDs rather than old-school bulbs, and such has been the advancement of technology, these can be blindingly bright.

Of course light power is an important part of your buying criteria, but don’t let that be the be-all and end-all. Beam shape and the effect of the light lens can make a huge difference — we’ve seen lights of supposedly lesser power trump rivals when it comes to real-world performance.

>>> Buyer’s guide to the best winter cycling clothing (video)

All these factors are of most importance if you’ll be using your front lamp to actually light your way. But bike lights perform another function: to warn other road users of your presence.

If you’ll be riding on lit roads, you may find the need for an ultra-bright constant beam is unnecessary and a flash function at the front is perfectly adequate.

Light and Motion Urban 650 comes highly recommended as a light weight, tool free bike light for just under £100

Light and Motion Urban 650 comes highly recommended as a light weight, tool free bike light for just under £100

Battery life and charging

For your rear light, the flash function is ideal. But if you’re a cycle commuter, with both front and rear lights also consider how effective the lamp is in terms of side lighting, as this will make you more visible from more angles and help avoid the “sorry mate, I didn’t see you” excuse from a turning or emerging vehicle.

It’s still generally a case of the brighter the better, but you also need to consider other qualities that will make your life easier. Look to see how many flash settings the light has; what the run times will be on a single charge or one set of batteries; and see if it has a rechargeable power source.

In this case, check if it needs its own special charger or if it can be recharged via USB, which aids convenience immensely. Some lights even have a helpful gauge showing how much power they have left.

>>> Winter road bike tyres

The last consideration is mounting. Smaller lights may be simply mounted using a rubber or silicon strap, whereas big lamps — especially front lights — may require a proper bracket. Truly powerful front lights may even feature an external battery pack that will also need to be accommodated on the bike.

In any case, if you’re planning to leave your bike parked up in public for any length of time, make sure your lamps can be easily removed.

Moon ADJ-1300 Front Light: powerful light to keep you riding through the winter

Moon ADJ-1300 Front Light: powerful light to keep you riding through the winter

Back-up lights and extra brightness

The typical cycle commuter on urban streets will only need a relatively simple set of front and rear lights. There’s still every reason to buy the best you can afford, and even double up with an extra set of cheap emergency-only flashers front and back. But if you’ll be riding off road or on unlit country lanes, you really do need to go for the bigger, more powerful lamps with wider beams.

>>> Best front bike lights for under £100

To augment their bike-mounted lamps, many riders also opt for helmet-mounted lights. These can be very effective and have the added benefit of directing the light wherever you are looking. However, these should be in addition to those on the bike, and not your only source of illumination.

>>> The best winter cycling jackets

Another sensible option is the dynamo light. This uses a compatible hub or wheel-rubbing bottle dynamo to convert your forward motion into electricity which then powers the light — so no need for batteries. Bottle dynamos can be disengaged in daylight hours so they don’t drag unnecessarily, and at night-time it means you’ll never need to worry about run times or recharging again.

Lezyne Femto Drive bike lights

Lezyne Femto Drive bike lights: compact, easy to attach and remove

Super safe accessories

Night riding isn’t just about illumination. In recent years a whole industry of associated safety accessories has come about.

For example, the Blaze laser light combines a high-powered rechargeable front lamp with a warning image of a cyclist projected by a built-in laser onto the road ahead of you. Similarly, the Xfire Bikelane looks just like a typical LED rear light, but it uses lasers to project virtual bike lane markings either side of you.


Dress properly for winter riding


In Cycling Weekly we’ve recently featured See.Sense lights, incredible front and rear lamps that use inbuilt sensor technology to flash brighter and faster when cyclists are in potentially dangerous scenarios.

Finally, although it’s only a relatively simple rear light, SpyLamp doubles up as a GPS tracking device should your bike get stolen. Think of it as an emergency flasher with hidden talents.

There are more innovative products appearing all the time, so do enjoy exploring the world of cycle lighting. Just remember, the basic rules haven’t changed: be safe, be seen.

  • Michael

    Just a point mentioned that isn’t quite accurate and keep hanging around in the cycling community. Lights measurment in lumens isn’t the intensity or brightness which is what is stated in this video. The value of lumens is a measure of the total light output of a light. A measurement of brightness would be lux, so while the two are linked they are not the same.

  • Richy

    Are these any good? Are they just using a generic design built in China with overstated lumen outputs? What is your opinion?

  • richardremlap

    I suggest more emphasis on dynamo lighting. Adding a front dynamo hub increases a bikes weight by between 160 – 200 gm. and the additional rolling resistance is minimal. Then one can have always-on bright LED lighting ensuring improved visibility in every sense, plus you can charge GPS, phone etc. and forget about batteries…

  • Jason Brogden

    Can we have someone do a ‘correct fitting guide’ for bike lights?
    Too often I see other cyclists with front lights pointing straight ahead, blinding oncoming road users eyes or into wing/rear view mirrors of other road users.
    Also rear lights fitted correctly so they can be seen clearly.

    With front bike lights becoming brighter than a cars ‘full beam’, we need to be considerate of other road users too.

    Motorised vehicles have their ‘MOT’ where lights are checked for correct alignment.
    I always set my front lights to an approximate 10-15ft focal point ahead of my front wheel so I can see the road ahead of me and have enough time to take action.

  • Hugh Strickland

    Cygo lights come in a variety of brightness and I love mine.

  • Tom Salmon

    After a lot of searching & crashing using a bad light … I chose C&B Seen (on amazon ~800 lumens ~£50) for my mountain bike ..