Stage finishes in Scarborough, Harrogate, and Sheffield

The route of the 2017 Tour de Yorkshire has been announced, with stage finishes in Scarborough, Harrogate and Fox Valley, Sheffield.

The three day stage race will start on Friday, April 28, and finish on Sunday April 30, with a one day women’s race taking place on the Saturday.

tdy17_map-stage1

Stage one will start in Bridlington on the east coast of the county, before heading inland into the Yorkshire Wolds, heading north over the Yorkshire Moors to a sprint in Whitby.

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The stage finish will be in Scarborough, which has hosted a stage in every edition of the Tour de Yorkshire. There are three climbs on the stage, at Garrowby, Goathland, and Robin Hood’s Bay.

tdy17_map-stage2

The second 122km stage will run from Tadcaster to Harrogate, and will be one for the sprinters with only one classified climb at the mid-point of the stage.

The final stage will start in central Bradford with a tough finishing circuit around the Fox Valley retail park just north of Sheffield.

tdy17_map-stage3

Nicknamed the “Yorkshire Terrier” by the race organiser, this 194.5km stage features eight classified climbs (four of which are in the final 20km) with over 3,000m of climbing.

The climbing in this brutal final stage is split into two sections. Firstly the “Côtes” of Silsden, Haworth, Leeming, and Shibden Wall to the west of Bradford.

However the crucial section is likely to be in the final circuit around Stocksbridge to the north of Sheffield.

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The Côte de Deepcar, Wigtwizzle, Ewden Height, and Midhopestones all come in the final 15km of the race, and all feature double didget gradients that should ensure either a solo winner or a small group at the finish.

As was the case in 2016, the women’s Tour de Yorkshire will have the same prize money as the men, with the women’s peloton tackling the route of the second stage from Tadcaster to Harrogate.

All stages, including the women’s race, will be live on television from start to finish.

The Harrogate stage is likely to have implications beyond the 2016 Tour de Yorkshire, with the town that hosted the first stage of the 2014 Tour de France Grand Dèpart also tipped to be the focal point of the 2019 UCI Road World Championships.

This could mean that this stage could act as an early indication of the sort of routes we could see at the World Championships, with possible contenders using it as an early recce two year’s ahead of 2019.

The Tour de Yorkshire was first held in 2015 building on the back of the county’s hosting of the 2014 Tour de France Grand Dèpart.

The first edition of the men’s race was won by Team Sky’s Lars Petter Nordhaug, while Direct Énergie’s Thomas Voeckler was victorious in 2016.

The women’s race was initially a criterium around the streets of York in 2015, won by Cycling Weekly writer Louise Mahé (IKON-Mazda), but the introduction of a longer road race route and a big prize pot enticed WorldTour riders in 2016, with Kirsten Wild (Team Hitec Products) winning the most lucrative race in women’s cycling.

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 route

The Tour de Yorkshire 2016 route has been unveiled, and the race will be hosted by six different towns.

The second edition of the race takes place from April 29 to May 1 and will visit three different start locations and three different finish towns.

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 full route

Stage one will take riders from Beverley to Settle and is widely billed as a sprinters’ stage. However, with plenty of home riders looking to make a name for themselves and a series of climbs before the end, it could be a day for a breakaway to chance its luck and go for the stage win.

This stage takes in some of the 2014 Tour de France Grand Départ route which should see the crowds out in their masses to line the roads.

The second stage could again be one for the sprinters, especially if their teams’ efforts were not rewarded the day before. This stage also has a few kicks towards the end that could split the bunch or set someone up for a solo break for glory.

Making its way from Otley to Doncaster, stage two takes in roads that have not been raced on in either the Tour de France or Tour de Yorkshire.

The start town is home to current World Champion Lizzie Armitstead who may take the line for the women’s race. Both the men’s and women’s races follow this route rather than the abridged version raced by the women last year.

The final stage includes more climbing and so could be the decider for the overall GC. Similar to some of the parcours used in 2015, stage three goes from Middlesbrough to Scarborough and takes in six King of the Mountain peaks in the 196km.

As well as the professional race, the Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride sportive will take place on the morning of stage three and use the same finishing kilometre and finish line.

The sportive offers routes of 40km, 85km, and 115km.

Tour de Yorkshire: Stage one

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage one map

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage one route profileDate: Friday, April 29
Where: Beverley to Settle
Distance: 184km
Elevation: 1832m
Who does it suit? Sprinters’ stage, if a break can’t use one of the climbs to get away
Sprints: Bubworth,  Giggleswick
KOM: Greenhow Hill

Tour de Yorkshire: Stage two (and women’s race)

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage two map

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage two (and women's) route profile

Date: Saturday, April 30
Where: Otley to Doncaster
Distance: 135.5km
Elevation: 1110m
Who does it suit? Sprinters’ stage, with a few small kicks towards the end
Sprints: Scholes, Warmsworth
KOMs: Harewood Bank, East Rigton, Conisbrough Castle

Women’s race: On the same course in the morning

Tour de Yorkshire: Stage three

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage three map

Tour de Yorkshire 2016 stage three route profile

Date: Sunday, May 1
Where: Middlesbrough to Scarborough
Distance: 196km
Elevation: 2593m climbing
Sprints: Thirsk, Whitby Abbey
KOMs: Sutton Bank, Blakey Ridge, Grosmont, Robin Hood’s Bay, Harwood Dale, Oliver’s Mount

Tour de Yorkshire 2015 route

The Tour de Yorkshire will return to the roads of last year’s Tour de France Grand Départ it was announced today, as the full route of the three-day legacy event, scheduled to take place on May 1-3, was unveiled in Bridlington.

The climb of Oxenhope Moor and a descent down Cragg Vale, England’s longest continuous climb, will feature on stage three of the race on May 3, which traces a good chunk of stage two of last year’s Tour in reverse.

Stage one will visit the stunning roads of the North York Moors, not included in the 2014 Tour de France, while stage two will conclude with a sprint finish into York.

A non UCI-ranked women’s event will also take place on May 2 in York.

A mass participation ride based in Leeds is planned for May 3; with around 3,000 places expected to be available, further details will be announced on January 28.

“After the grandest of Grand Départs of the Tour de France, we were keen to return to Yorkshire,” said Christian Prudhomme, director of the Tour de France.

“With its stunning landscapes, iconic cities and tough climbs, Yorkshire offers all the ingredients needed for a great cycling race.”

Ranked 2.1, the event will attract teams from the WorldTour and Professional Cotinental ranks, while UCI Continental and national teams can also receive invitations.

For more on the Tour de Yorkshire, including an exclusive behind the scenes look at how organisers ASO and Welcome to Yorkshire designed the route for the race, pick up a copy of this week’s Cycling Weekly, out on Thursday January 22.

2015 Tour de Yorkshire route

Tour de Yorkshire 2015 map

Tour de Yorkshire 2015 map

Stage one
Date: Friday, May 1
Where: Bridlington to Scarborough
Distance: 174km
One for: Punchy climbers
Look out for: Short sharp climbs in Dalby Forest; the climb out of Robin Hood’s Bay.

Tour de Yorkshire Stage one route map

Tour de Yorkshire Stage one route map

Stage two
Date: Saturday, May 2
Where: Selby to York
Distance: 174km
One for: Sprinters
Look out for: Rolling hills in the Wolds; a spectacular sprint finish in York.

Tour de Yorkshire Stage two route map

Tour de Yorkshire Stage two route map

Stage three
Date: Sunday, May 3
Where: Wakefield to Leeds
Distance: 167km
One for: Punchy climbers
Look out for: The penultimate climb over the Cow and Calf near Ilkley

Tour de Yorkshire Stage three route map

Tour de Yorkshire Stage three route map

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Tour de Yorkshire 2016 route
  3. 3. Tour de Yorkshire 2015 route
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  • Mary Heath

    Is this being shown on TV? and if so where?

  • llos25

    Greenhow is one hell of a hard climb especially if your racing.

  • poisonjunction

    I’m with you Baz, it’s probably organiser insecurity – ‘Tour de Yorkshire’! Just maybe ‘Tour o’t Yorkshire’!
    Time t’organisers got real. and sold ‘Yorkshire’ for what it is, not French territory, nor the race a poor relation of the ‘Tour de France’!

    So why ‘Col’ and ‘Cote’ and not plain ‘Climb’ ‘Hill’ or ‘Peak’, and whose daffy idea to prefix ‘Otley Chevin’ . . . . perhaps come the Autumn we’ll all be riding ‘Cote’ or ‘Col’ TTs!

    Do they expect TdF style crowds from all over UK to turn up, if so the’re going to be disappointed [in my opinion].
    The TdF is a one off, even in it’s own country repeated year after year, it pales and may be why the adventure of ‘Grand Departes” outside it’s own borders are becoming the norm. and a wider source of revenue than cash strapped fro . er locals!

    It might have been better to encourage the former 14 day ‘Tour of Britain’ to stay longer in Yorkshire . . . !

    Be different, rename it. ‘Riding Yorkshire’s Ridings’, makes it peculiar t’County, and says it all – no ‘Tour de’ necessary.

  • George Buckton

    Could the organizers please consider Rievaulx in any future tour. It has all the ingredients and would be a fantastic sight.
    A past Rievaulx resident.

  • Baz Elvin

    Ah’m surprised t’organisers ‘aven’t included t’Cote de Tongue-in-Cheek and
    t’Col d’Irony,
    Any road, ‘appen it’ll be Grand.