New direction for Genesis brand, previously best known for its range of steel bikes

British bike brand Genesis has launched a new Zero model range, the brand’s first foray into carbon-fibre.

The bike will be used by the Madison-Genesis racing team during the Tour of Britain, starting on September 7 in Liverpool.

The Zero range comprises six models all using the same sub-1kg frameset, ranging in price from the entry-level Zero.1 at £1299.99 to the Shimano Dura-Ace geared Team at £4499.99.

According to Genesis, the bike was 18 months in development and has been designed “to meet the extreme demands of stage racing”. It’s not all about speed: features have been incorporated into the design to aid comfort, including thin seatstays to provide vertical compliance.

Both the team and Genesis customers will still be able to choose the steel 953 Volare as an alternative high-end, race-ready machine.

“We are excited to announce our debut carbon range, Zero,” said Genesis brand director Phil Hammill. “This gives the public and the Madison Genesis team a full choice of frames, which excel in different environments – the Volare will continue to be used in next year’s Pearl Izumi Tour Series whilst the Zero will be used in stage races, such as the Tour of Britain.”

“We are really proud with how Zero has turned out. The only way this project could be viable was by doing it our way, with the brand principles we believe in. We have invested heavily in developing our own tooling and moulds to ensure this bike is exactly how we intended it to be. We believe strongly in the Zero, which is why we will be offering a lifetime warranty on all Zero frames.”

The Zero.1 and Team models are available now, with the remainder of the range hitting shops in the autumn.

Genesis Zero.2

Genesis Zero.2

Genesis Zero.3

Genesis Zero.3

Genesis Zero.4

Genesis Zero.4

Genesis Zero Team

Genesis Zero Team

Genesis Zero.1

Genesis Zero.1

  • Derek Biggerstaff

    What was wrong with the comment I left here?

  • Peddler

    First they reinvent steel, now carbon fibre? If only their US companies were this innovative.