Rather than custom frame geometry, or anything dedicated for sprinting, ‘The Gorilla’ rides Ridley’s latest aero bike, the Noah FB Fast.



As well as the obvious aero profile tubing, the fork and seatstays have technology licensed from Oval Concepts. This slotted design claims to allow dirty air an escape route rather than baulking other flow. There is also textured paint on leading edges to add some surface micro turbulence (think golf balls dimples) and hidden brakes that actually make up an extension of the F-Stays slots.



Frame aside, deep section wheels are shod with German rubber in the shape of Continentals Competition tubulars. In order to measure the claimed 2,000 watts at peak, the hollow carbon Campagnolo cranks incorporate an SRM power meter and the electronic theme continues with the EPS drivechain.





Just like Cav, Greipel uses an oversize handlebar and stem. Rather than being internally reinforced, the Deda 35 system on the Germans machine increases stiffness simply by increasing the diameter of the handlebar top, clamp and stem extension.





F-Brake, aero, cross top, riders like the brake feel and there’s no doubting the shrouding afforded by its design but interestingly the teams mechanics aren’t overly keen. It’s not difficult to adjust per se, but from the team car, centering is nigh on impossible as the arms are adjusted by slotting a thin Allen key into the visible hole turning a quarter turn at a time.





Due to the size of the Campagnolo battery pack, the Lotto mechanics have had to raise the bottle cage on Greipel’s seat tube. By butchering another slotted battery mount section and attaching the bottle cage to it, rather than the frame’s dedicated bosses, they get the necessary clearance.





‘The Gorilla’ rides Ridley’s latest aero bike, the Noah FB Fast.



Related Tour bikes:

Matt Goss’s Scott Foil F01

Cavendish’s Pinarello Dogma 2

Philippe Gilbert’s BMC Teammachine SLR01

Cadel Evans’s Team BMC TM01

Lampre’s Wilier Cento 1 SR

Michael Schar’s BMC TMR01