The Giro d’Italia fined Spaniard Alberto Contador on Tuesday, two days after he took the leader’s pink jersey on Mount Etna, for skipping the post-race press conference after stage 10.

An official race jury communiqué stated that Contador did not “respect contract obligations.”

The race jury fined him 1000CHF or £690 (€790).

“The team told us that Contador doesn’t have enough time,” press officer, Matteo Cavazzuti told Cycling Weekly. “We are upset about it, we want him here.”

Contador won the Tour de France three times and the Giro in 2008, but he has never faced the possibility of defending the leader’s jersey for so long. If he keeps it until the end, he’ll have to defend it for 12 days.

The Giro requires the race leader and stage winner to attend the post-race press conference each day. After the Mount Etna win, Contador spoke with TV and radio press, first Spaniards and then other nationalities. Afterwards, he attended a press conference in the same area for written press.

After today’s stage won by Mark Cavendish in Teramo, Contador spoke with TV and radio press, but skipped the press conference for written press.

“It’s too much,” Contador’s press officer, Jacinto Vidarte told Cycling Weekly. “He can’t do it every day if he has it for two more weeks. Plus, they want him to answer five questions to every TV camera and in different languages.”

Vidarte added that the Tour de France is organised much better for the press. Each day, the riders pass a waiting area for TV, radio and written press immediately before entering a mobile press conference room.

“It’s all done before anti-doping,” added Vidarte, “here, they make the rider do anti-doping first.”

The press conference room today in Teramo was 1,800 metres from the finish. The distance was not long, but would have required a car ride after Contador gave TV and radio interviews and anti-doping tests.

Cavazzuti already informed the written press that Contador, if he still has the race lead, will be unavailable after the Ravenna stage on Thursday. The riders and race caravan faces a three-hour transfer to the start of the next stage in Spilimbergo.

Lance Armstrong often skipped press conferences racing to his seven Tour de France victories.

Giro d’Italia 2011: Latest news

Giro d’Italia News Shorts (May 15)

Giro’s Sicilian cyclists proud to face Mount Etna

Contador surprises at Giro with attack ahead of mountains

Contador minds food at Giro as CAS decision nears

Weening supported by Rabobank and model Kroes

Local lad Appollonio bears fruit in Fiuggi

Giro d’Italia News Shorts (May 12 edition)

Blythe finding way in second Grand Tour

Leopard-Trek withdraws from Giro d’Italia

Leopard-Trek uncertain to continue in Giro

Tuesday’s Giro stage in memory of Weylandt

Giro doctor describes actions to save Weylandt

Wouter Weylandt killed in Giro crash

Giro news shorts (May 8)

Cavendish likely to take Giro lead tomorrow

Giro 2011: Who will win?

Kennaugh to lead Team Sky in Giro’s opening stage

Nibali’s Giro fight with Contador may reach the courtroom

Riis defends Contador’s participation in Giro

Cavendish set to start winning again at the Giro

Doping investigations force cyclists out of Giro d’Italia

Kennaugh replaces Pauwels in Sky’s Giro line-up

Contador scouts out the Giro mountains

Cavendish and Millar top list of Giro-bound Brits

Lampre likely for Giro despite doping investigation

Giro announces record 23 teams to race

2011 Giro to start in Turin with team time trial

Giro goes one up on the Tour with spectacular route

Nygaard, Sciandri and Lloyd comment on 2011 Giro route

Nibali’s Giro d’Italia?

Giro d’Italia 2011: Stage reports



Stage 10: Cavendish opens his Giro account



Stage nine: Contador storms Etna to take Giro lead



Stage eight: Gatto springs late attack to take win



Stage seven: Neo-pro De Clercq wins by a whisker



Stage six: Ventoso steals Giro stage six win


Stage five: Weening holds on to take stage and maglia rosa



Stage four: Tearful Farrar and Leopard-Trek lead riders across stage four finish line



Stage three: Vicioso victory overshadowed by Weylandt crash



Stage two: Petacchi wins as Cavendish takes lead



Stage one: HTC-Highroad wins Giro’s opening team time trial

Giro d’Italia 2011: Photo galleries

Stage 10 photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage nine photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage eight photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage seven photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage six photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage five photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage four photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage three photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage two photo gallery by Graham Watson

Stage one photo gallery by Graham Watson

Giro d’Italia 2011: Live text coverage



Giro d’Italia 2011 stage seven live text updates



Giro d’Italia 2011 stage five live text updates



Follow the 2011 Giro d’Italia live with Cycling Weekly

Giro d’Italia 2011: Start list



Giro d’Italia 2011: Start list

Giro d’Italia 2011: TV schedule



Giro d’Italia 2011: British Eurosport TV schedule

Related links



Giro d’Italia 2010: Cycling Weekly’s coverage index

 

  • Jeremy Thomas

    As you stated at the end of your column. Lance Armstrong missed a number of press conferences. Did he recieve fines or any other penalty?
    Having followed cycling for many years, travelled to France to spectate at Le Tour a number of times. I have now become used to the doping revelations after watching a supposedly good, honest contest.
    The governing body and race organisers need to reduce the length of grand tours and individual stages. It,s not physically possible for the riders to perform at these speeds for this duration. In the end it,s all about T.V rights and sponsors. For me it,s a game of. Who,s next?? The sport is dying, a sad endictment to what could be. A beautiful sport.
    Please, no one tell me it,s getting better. I,ve seen it all before. Very sad.

  • Brendan Power

    As your article says, “The Giro requires the race leader and stage winner to attend the post-race press conference each day”. Riders know this in advance, and there is no compulsion to take part in the race so there is no excuse.

  • kate

    Part of the job I’m afraid so get on with it, if you can’t or won’t do it, face the consequences.

    Unfortunately given the toughness of the sport the riders are mobile display boards for their sponsors and the event sponsors and both factors rely on publicity.

  • theswordsman

    Saturday Contador was mobbed by Spanish press, but managed to break through after a few questions, saying he needed recovery time. Sunday Saxo Bank flew him to the mainland on a private plane. He’s said that having the jersey costs an hour or hour and a half out of his recovery time every day. He’s not just trying to put on a show at one of the toughest Giro’s ever, he’s also going for the Tour de France double. It’s a shame, but the race is set up so that it’s tough for him to give up the jersey and get it back later.