Matt Lloyd succeeded in taking a dream win two weeks ago in the Giro d’Italia’s sixth stage to Marina di Carrara, but he is planning for another success.

With his solo win, escaping over the Bedizzano climb, the 27-year-old Australian from team Omega Pharma-Lotto took the climbers’ green jersey. He has kept hold of it over the following 12 stages and now wants to take it to the end, to Verona.

His biggest rivals could be the Giro d’Italia’s overall favourites: Cadel Evans and Ivan Basso. They both have 25 points, four less than Lloyd’s 29.

“We have spoken to the other guys, they know the green jersey is important for us and it is a different ball game from the overall classification,” explained Lloyd. “So, the most dangerous guy is Ludovic Turpin, he is only a few points behind.”

To help himself win, Lloyd wrote down on his top tube the race numbers of the three most dangerous rivals: 29, 32 and 79.

“They are the potential guys to steal the points,” he continued. “They want it.”

Matthew Lloyd wins Giro d'Italia stage 6



Matthew Lloyd wins stage six of the 2010 Giro d’Italia

He was safe on Thursday because the stage to Brescia offered no classified mountains for his rivals to take points. Lloyd has to take part in an escape on Friday or Saturday to take points on the famous climbs, like Gavia or Mortirolo, and secure the green jersey. If he fails, Evans and Basso will likely take the points on the final climbs while fighting or the race lead.

“We have to be playing our cards correctly. We have to look at one specific point in the race where we need to get points,” continued Lloyd.

“Obviously, for someone who is a climber, it would be pretty beautiful to ride over Gavia in the lead. But, you have to consider the specific details of each stage. It will be interesting.”

Related links



Giro d’Italia 2010: Cycling Weekly’s coverage index

2010 Giro d’Italia coverage in association with Zipvit


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