Omega Pharma-Quick Step sports director Brian Holm has pointed a finger at the media after a fan reportedly sprayed urine at Mark Cavendish during today’s 11th stage of the Tour de France.

Holm was in the team car behind Cavendish who was competing in the 33km individual time-trial when the incident occurred.

It comes a day after the 28-year-old was embroiled in a crash controversy with Argos-Shimano lead-out man Tom Veelers.

“Of course I couldn’t see it was urine but I thought people were quite negative,” Holm told Cycling Weekly. “So congrats to the media for yesterday making him look like he caused the crash.”

Cavendish and Veelers made contact in yesterday’s high-speed finale. Veelers had finished his lead-out for teammate Marcel Kittel, who won the stage ahead of Andre Greipel (Lotto Belisol), before he clashed with Cavendish, who ran third, and hit the tarmac sustaining extensive skin abrasions and bruises.

Cavendish was pressed on the crash in post-race interviews where he became frustrated and pinched a journalist’s recording device, which was soon after returned. 

The Dutchman Veelers was adamant the 24-time Tour de France stage winner was at fault, but the race jury issued no penalty.

“Everybody said it was Cav, Cav, Cav. The international commissaries said he made no mistake,” Holm continued. “It’s not going to be a long discussion. It’s part of the race. And Cav would never, ever crash somebody on purpose.”

Holm said the team did not plan to take action after today’s drama.

“I hope it’s not a general situation,” said Holm. “He’s going to have some long days in the Alps if people keep throwing piss on him!”

The sprinters have another chance to vie for line honours tomorrow. Kittel has two stage victories to his name thus far with Cavendish, Greipel and green jersey leader and defending champion Peter Sagan (Cannondale) at one a piece. 


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  • gnome

    Yep, the more I see it happening, the more it seems Veerlers was being an obstructionist. Tacky. Guess he got his due.

  • Tim Deegan

    As noted above, seems clear Veelers moved decisively across toward Cav who refused to be blocked from moving in the opposite direction. Can’t see why Cav gets much blame for the result frankly. Anybody who thinks this kind of thing is bad needs to review any videos they can find of Abdou at his royal best.

  • TG

    Tom Veelers should be reprimanded for sitting up in a buch sprint when holding 3rd wheel at 150m to go. Doing that has got to be dangerous. Riders should be made to keep sprinting to the line and not veer off.

  • Rich

    The commissaries may not have punished Cav but I think the evidence is pretty conclusive in showing he gave Veelers a shoulder barge as he went past. I think he would be better served by holding his hand up to admit his mistake.
    Veelers himself doesn’t come out of this for me with any credit. He clearly looked behind to check where Cav was before moving across to try to block Cav’s sprint. If lead out riders are going to start adopting this tactic then the logical conclusion is that teams will put riders at the front not to assist their own team mates but to block off rivals. The result would be carnage.

  • Colnago dave

    Spectators like the dickheads who throw urine on riders should just crawl back into their holes in the ground and never re emerge.
    Why is it the Tours attract all the nutters who are obviously not true fans but just drunken Ass holes.

  • edward hutton

    oh dear cav caused a crash near to the finish when in the past its been somebody caused a crash so that he could not contest the sprint TED H