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Your first priority when locking up your bike is to secure the frame, so it can be easy to forget about the wheels and other components, leaving them vulnerable to any potential thief with an Allen key, spanner, or the ability to use a quick release. But thanks to Hexlox, you might soon be able to secure these too without the need for another lock.

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Currently seeking funding on Kickstarter, Hexlox is a system that magnetically secures a second bolt head into the head of any 4mm, 5mm, or 6mm Allen bolt, meaning that the Allen bolt cannot be removed until you’ve removed the Hexlox, something which can only be done using the unique key that comes with each Hexlox.

Weighing just 2g per bolt, you shouldn’t notice the extra mass even if you’re using them on a featherweight climbing bike, and they’re pretty hard to spot once they’re on the bike. In fact, the only downside for most riders will be the fact that you’ll need to use skewers that are secured using Allen keys rather than quick releases if you want to secure your wheel.

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Hexlox is currently looking to raise €20,000 on Kickstarter, and there are various packages available to backers, starting from €21 (£16) for two Hexlox bolts and a key. If the crowdfunding campain is successful, then shipping is planned for between May and June.

  • bobolicious1

    if they can manage to get bolt cutters around the 15 mm thick hardend steel then they can have at it. i don’t leave my bike more then 5 mins at any one given time anyway, so the chances of someone coming within that time frame and stealing it, both in that window i’m not to worried. Pluss i have 2 chains they would have to get past. Also i do not leave my bike unattended in an area where allot of people are at. Just don’t be stupid and leave your bike where you know it will get stolen and you should be fine.

  • Mike Prytherch

    42″ bolt croppers will easily get through 15mm chain I’m sorry to say, especially if the chain is close to the floor, there is another article by a bike thief that was posted on here a few days ago, worth a read.

  • bobolicious1

    yeah exactly. As the one video interview with a prior bike thief said. It’s not worth selling a bike as parts. You just don’t make enough off that to be worth your time. Just get a Decent thick chain lock for each wheel / frame and maybe a Loud alarm and be done with it. That’s what i use and i never had any problems. Then again i don’t live in london i am in usa.

  • bobolicious1

    i use a 15 mm hardend steel t3 chain lock. Its heavy yes but i leave it chained to the bike when not in use. I trust that more then anything. I never leave my bike more then a few mins anyway worth way to much.

  • bobolicious1

    what would stop someone from buying one of those tools and making duplicates or getting that tool on ebay? Its not like a key which everyone is different from another. That would be like buying a bike lock with the same key everyone else has lol.

  • gbacoder

    if you can afford the luxury of spending a lot to save 120g, you can surely afford the £10 it costs to protect each wheel. Or another £7 to protect the seat post. what price is peace of mind? the luxury of a cafe stop is something cyclists should not ignore bc they are worried about their bike parts. and this kit adds very little weight. it’s a great innovation! I don’t get your logic..

  • gbacoder

    only going on what you said, “I reckon I would notice an extra 120g on a bike weighing 5.6kg…I’d hope so anyway, given what it cost to get it there.” I could not sense you were in any way joking in that comment 🙂

  • gbacoder

    I said cheap compared to titanium, that’s what you were saying right…

  • Ramuel Sees

    Cheap galvanised steel ones that rust? Hmmm…

  • Neb

    I think you may be taking my weight comment a little too seriously…

    The real point is the number of these things you’d need to make a serious stab at protecting all the bits that might get nicked. They’re about 4x the price they need to be to make any sense.

  • gbacoder

    yeah i like these new locks, great innovation!

  • gbacoder

    how much do you weigh / body fat percentage? my guess is you could save FAR more weight there, like most people. and not have to worry about an overly expensive bike being stolen. most would be better off investing in a personal trainer, or even better just using their own motivation / will power to shed weight. There’s far more weight to be shifted that way for most..

  • gbacoder

    replace them with cheap bolts, it’s not rocket science

  • llos25

    Would they not just pinch the bike either ride it away or put it in a van.

  • paul morgan

    Well, you might… but if you’re leaving your bike locked up somewhere you’ll also be carrying one or two 2kg D Locks and you’ll notice those a whole lot more. I’d never leave my race bike locked up somewhere unattended so that’s probably not the use case here. It’s more for protecting your go-anywhere and commute bike that 120g really wouldn’t be an issue on. My son recently had his complete cockpit stolen (105 shifters, bars, stem) from his properly locked up bike. That was expensive – much more than a front wheel.

  • Ramuel Sees

    Good point… And also non-magnetic varieties of stainless steel bolts? (Which you might find on a cheaper bike)

  • dougles

    Do you notice the weight difference if you have an extra small glass of water before you leave the house? 120g is nothing, you’re kidding yourself!

  • Neb

    I reckon I would notice an extra 120g on a bike weighing 5.6kg…I’d hope so anyway, given what it cost to get it there. Experience says that scum will steal anything that’s not nailed down. Obviously I wouldn’t leave a bike with e.g. Mandibles or Di2 9070 shifters out of sight in any case, but I suppose the idea here is to be less paranoid during the cafe stop.

  • dougles

    >I think I’d notice the extra weight if I changed my Ti/carbon skewers for steel ones so that the Hexlox would work…

    I’m almost certain that you wouldn’t. No wait. Certain.

    I’m not sure you would need a hexlox for every bolt. Things that get stolen are wheels (only one set needed as either you have one wheel locked to something, or you only stick a hexlox inside one side of each wheel), saddle (one for saddle end, one for seat clamp) and possibly the stem.

    Having said that, if you have a cockpit, saddle, or wheel which is that desirable then a thief will take it. People have been using a rudimentary hexlox for a while, by gluing ball bearings into the allen recesses (then using acetone to remove it if they need to adjust), but it doesn’t stop a thief hacksawing a seatpost or stem in a few minutes. You can’t protect against theft but you can provide a deterrent. Personally I don’t see the point in hexlox when a ball bearing serves exactly the same purpose for 10p.

  • Alan

    Maybe don’t leave your bike with titanium bolts locked up outside?

  • Neb

    I think I’d notice the extra weight if I changed my Ti/carbon skewers for steel ones so that the Hexlox would work…

    That said, my commuter bike uses Pitlock skewers, and I’ve replaced all the other bolts on the bike with security Torx. This might be a better solution than that, since I could use the same key throughout, and wouldn’t be vulnerable to a thief with a security Torx bit. On the other hand, that’s 21 Hexlox (6 bolts in the stem – or 7 if superlogic – 1 in the steerer bung, 2 in the skewers – assuming blind ends on the other side – 4 cage bolts, seat-clamp, saddle clamp – assuming single bolt – fd bolt – assuming bolt on, not clamp-on, rd bolt, shifter bolts, front and rear brakes). Another 4 to secure a rack, plus 2 for the dynamo lamp mounts. Even if you only use 1 Hexlox where there are multiple fixings, that’s still 15 for a road bike, 18 for a tourer. At €10,50 per bolt, that’s a fair amount of cost for security.

  • LMGTFY

    They even said they gave it to some lock picking society which I think would be infinitely better than a common thief. That was what put my mind at rest.

  • Ramuel Sees

    If it’s magnetically held, how do you fit it to non-magnetic hex-socket bolts, i.e., Titanium?

  • Jonathan N

    Something like a channel lock used on the outside of the bolt head seems like the biggest risk. That said, this could be mitigated if the bolt heads being protected are designed well (convex) or recessed into the part itself.

  • Mike Prytherch

    Thanks Ian, that answers my question, of course this wasn’t covered in the video, just a magnet, you have put my mind at rest, perhaps you can also include other forms of attack in the next video.

  • Mike Prytherch

    I’m unsure of your point in your reply, of course no lock is 100% proof, but it’s the level of ease of cracking that’s important, 42″ bolt croppers will cut through almost every lock on the market, but not many thieves carry them as they are massive !!!!!, but a screw extractor is the size of a pencil, if something the size a pencil can extract this then it makes it very easy to by-pass, that’s what I meant, Ian B has replied with a far more sensible comment to my sensible question.

  • Michael Cook

    Because most people carry a bolt extractor around. If someone really wants to steal your bike, seat, wheels, etc, they’re going to. There’s no bike lock that’s a 100% theft proof. Wall safes get cracked all the time. It’s a theft deterrent.

  • Ian B

    Hexlox have been tested against this type of attack – the middle (red) pin prevents the insertion of this or any type of tool. In addition this red pin is at a 40 degree angle, is highly polished and is hardened 316 Stainless steel, all combined this prevents any ‘biting’ into the surface and subsequent leverage point.

    Ian B. Head Engineer, Hexlox

  • Willie Fijolek

    Thx

  • Marc Sparc

    They have a large number of different keys which makes that difficult.

  • Willie Fijolek

    Can’t a thief also just buy a Hexlox and use it?

  • Marc Sparc

    Yeah it really looks that way, but I could couldnt when I went to one of the Demos in Berlin where Hexlox was showing off their stuff and tried a couple of weeks ago. The system is pretty cool, but Obviously there is nothing which is 100% safe out there. They also had a screw extractor there which proved pretty useless as it could not go well past the pin. Anyhow, my 2 cents.

  • Smitty

    For the bike in the video, certainly looks like you’d be able to undo that bolt with a decent pair of pliers / mole grips. Appreciate that wouldn’t work for allen bolts where the head is not exposed.
    Agree with Mike on the screw extractor point.
    This lock is basically a glorified version of supergluing a ball bearing into the head of the bolt

  • Mike Prytherch

    I would like to see this fair against a simple screw extractor